Every child is unique and will perform in the right environment

We want to understand the individual

What do you really mean by "small classes"?

Many parents feel anxious when they see a mismatch between their child's results versus their expectations for them and struggle with the question of whether they're pushing too hard or not hard enough? "What is stopping my child performing?" is an all too common question from stressed parents.

children in science class

This mismatch is often a result of a incongruence between the child and his/her school environment. A growing number of children are simply not comfortable in the traditional class of 25 to 30 pupils, but are also not remedial candidates. They are children who respond to a more interactive and individualised approach than a large class can provide, and are academically very capable.

Our classes are really small. Our Grade 4 to 9 classes have a maximum of 10 learners per class and our Grade 10 to 12 learners have a maximum of 12 in the compulsory subjects (languages and Life Orientation). Such small classes enable us to facilitate our mentoring style of teaching and provides on-going opportunities to engage with students on a very personal and individual basis.

Read More: Finding the right school for your child.

Does "small classes" mean remedial?

While it's understandable, with such small classes, that some people erroneously think we're a remedial school, however, we're not. We are a mainstream school, writing the Independent Examination Board (IEB) Matric, with the same expectations of academic rigour as any other IEB private school.

In our experience, many children are incorrectly "flagged" as requiring remedial education when, in fact, they would benefit greatly from being in our very small classes receiving one-on-one personal attention from their teachers.

grade 6 class photo on chairs

Education Incorporated students demonstrate independence, integrity and influence, though they don't always start off that way.

The potential we are looking for is a spark of independent thinking in the kindling of their future that we can blow on and nurture. We aim to grow your child into the best possible version of themselves so they can enter the world as a critical thinking, problem-solving adult.

In the very first chapter of our book "Educating Your 22nd Century Child" we discuss the symptoms you can expect to see when a child is placed in a school that's wrong for them. For example, the bad days become much more frequent than the good, tears, sore tummies, excessive anxiety, or, your child comes right out and tells you.

We also share the story of Ronald, a pupil in grade 6, was not enjoying his school experience.

Listen to Ronald's story

Read More: Children need structure and predictability.

Not all children are academically inclined

An integral part of the EduInc admission process is the completion of a Trial Week by the child. This affords all of us, Parent, Child and School to meet and get to know a bit about who your child really is and if our school is a good fit. Should it be evident that your child

Read More: Finding the right school for your child.

Give your child the best possible chance to perform

This mismatch is often a result of an incongruence between the child and his/her school environment. A growing number of children are simply not comfortable in the traditional class of 25 to 30+ pupils, but are also not remedial candidates. They are children who respond to a more interactive and individualised approach than a large class can provide, and are academically very capable. All they need to succeed academically is an environment that recognises them as individuals and who can respond to that need.

Here's Charlie's story which may help you too:

Charlie attended a private school from grade R and by grade 5 had repeated a year, was regularly seeing an occupational therapist, a speech therapist and a psychologist. As if this weren't enough, he also had an assistant throughout his school day to help him read, organise his books, stationery, classwork and schedule and help him with homework. Despite all these measures, he was still performing poorly and in danger of failing another year.

We advised Charlie's parents that the constant assistance, repeated psycho-educational testing and arguably intense therapies had reached a point of reinforcing only one thing in Charlie: that there was something wrong with him. His parents were frustrated at spending so much money every month for what seemed like very little progress. Charlie was perhaps even more frustrated as he had lost all sense of independence and control over his school work and educational environment.

Charlie came to Education Incorporated at the beginning of his grade 6 year. His therapy schedule was reduced to occasional visits to the psychologist and he no longer had an assistant in class with him. The first two terms were tough for Charlie. He had to learn to start thinking for himself, to take ownership of work and to experience the consequences of his decisions, both good and unpleasant. He was taught how to study effectively and how to manage his time and organise his work space. He was expected to make an effort and work. Within two terms Charlie's marks had improved dramatically (including a couple of distinctions) but most importantly, he was happy and enjoying school, feeling in control and completely able to cope with his academic schedule and requirements. Getting his academics under control meant that he could focus more time on his passion - cricket - earning himself cricket colours by the end of grade 7. His parents kept commenting on how family members and friends could not believe this was the same child.

The ability to streamline Charlie's academics and allow him to excel in his chosen sport is another by-product of the very small classes and how they allow us to customise a child's educational experience around their talents and passions, allowing them the opportunity to turn these into professional careers. Education Incorporated has students who have already excelled in their sporting disciplines to provincial and national levels, even representing South Africa as Junior Springboks.

These students are taught to understand the value and significance of accountability - the school assists them in structuring their academic schedules around their tournaments, travelling and gruelling training schedules, but expects commitment and dedication to their academic performance in return for this flexibility. This ability to find balance and a manner in which every person can customise their purpose in life is a vital 22nd century skill.

Read More: Children need structure and predictability.

Contact Education Incorporated

At EduInc we talk about things face-to-face. To start a conversation with us and establish if we are the right match for your educational expectations, please contact us on +27 (0)11-467-8015.